SUPERFANS ONLY NEED APPLY: Review of THE AMAZING STORY OF THE FANTASTICKS by Donald C. Farber and Robert Viagas

SUPERFANS ONLY NEED APPLY: Review of THE AMAZING STORY OF THE FANTASTICKS by Donald C. Farber and Robert Viagas

When I was in high school on Long Island in the 1990s, my dream was to be on Broadway. The idea then was to be a “triple-threat”—the best at singing, dancing, and acting. I had no idea how to go about this at all. I thought I could accomplish much in my room, alone, in secret. I scoured the pages of Backstage for auditions, and sent headshot photos with my meager resume stapled to the back. One listing was for a part I’d actually played in a regional theater, the role of the young romantic lead in a small, eight-person musical called The Fantasticks.

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HOT TOWN, SUMMER IN THE CITY: Review of DANCER FROM THE DANCE by Andrew Holleran

HOT TOWN, SUMMER IN THE CITY: Review of DANCER FROM THE DANCE by Andrew Holleran

Andrew Holleran’s 1978 novel, Dancer From the Dance, is about gay men in 1970s New York looking for love—and falling for the city itself. The romantic, elegiac tone has much in common with F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby and Truman Capote’s Breakfast at Tiffany’s. All three of these stories meditate on the power of beauty, mystery, doom, glamour, summer, and romance. All three are narrated by characters that stand outside the main action, and all three feature New York City as a central character. The city as it’s depicted here is more than a place: it’s an idea, often a romantic ideal, and sometimes a trap.

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