HOT TOWN, SUMMER IN THE CITY: Review of DANCER FROM THE DANCE by Andrew Holleran

HOT TOWN, SUMMER IN THE CITY: Review of DANCER FROM THE DANCE by Andrew Holleran

Andrew Holleran’s 1978 novel, Dancer From the Dance, is about gay men in 1970s New York looking for love—and falling for the city itself. The romantic, elegiac tone has much in common with F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby and Truman Capote’s Breakfast at Tiffany’s. All three of these stories meditate on the power of beauty, mystery, doom, glamour, summer, and romance. All three are narrated by characters that stand outside the main action, and all three feature New York City as a central character. The city as it’s depicted here is more than a place: it’s an idea, often a romantic ideal, and sometimes a trap.

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EBONY AND IVORY: Review of DOG YEARS: A MEMOIR by Mark Doty

EBONY AND IVORY: Review of DOG YEARS: A MEMOIR by Mark Doty

“To choose to live with a dog,” Mark Doty writes at the start of Dog Years: A Memoir, “is to agree to participate in a long process of interpretation—a mutual agreement, though the human being holds most of the cards.” In moving but restrained prose, Doty reveals the cards held closest to his chest: his feelings about loving and losing his canine companions, Arden and Beau.

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READING WITH A PENCIL: Review of BETWEEN YOU & ME: CONFESSIONS OF A COMMA QUEEN by Mary Norris

READING WITH A PENCIL: Review of BETWEEN YOU & ME: CONFESSIONS OF A COMMA QUEEN by Mary Norris

Copy editor Mary Norris investigates grammar—its usage and history—and frequently digresses. These tangents are the heart and soul of this quirky book. Many of them relate to her investigation of the English language, some are deeply personal, and others concern her work at the influential weekly magazine, The New Yorker.

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"NOTHING HAS CHANGED:" Review of NOT YOUR MOTHER'S RULES: THE NEW SECRETS FOR DATING by Ellen Fein and Sherrie Schneider

"NOTHING HAS CHANGED:" Review of NOT YOUR MOTHER'S RULES: THE NEW SECRETS FOR DATING by Ellen Fein and Sherrie Schneider

I was watching a lot of the old Hammer Horror Dracula movies at the same time I was reading this, and I think there are a lot of similarities. Facing something scary and possibly unknown, you want to arm yourself with knowledge and weapons, however regressive they may be. Vampires hate sunlight, garlic, the sign of the cross, and holy water. Guys like a girl who looks “hot, hot, hot. Not slutty—sexy!” Guys like a chase.

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"MINDSET INFLUENCES MORTALITY": Review of HOW HEALING WORKS: GET WELL AND STAY WELL USING YOUR HIDDEN POWER TO HEAL by Wayne Jonas, M.D.

"MINDSET INFLUENCES MORTALITY": Review of HOW HEALING WORKS: GET WELL AND STAY WELL USING YOUR HIDDEN POWER TO HEAL by Wayne Jonas, M.D.

In How Healing Works: Get Well and Stay Well Using Your Hidden Power to Heal, author Dr. Wayne Jonas traces the decline of our health care system. He sees it as “a triple oxymoron—it produces only about 20% of the public’s health, it is difficult for those working in it to deliver compassionate care, and it is not an integrated system. No health, no care, and not a system!”

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MANDATORY READING: Review of ZERO WASTE HOME: THE ULTIMATE GUIDE TO SIMPLIFYING YOUR LIFE BY REDUCING YOUR WASTE by Bea Johnson

MANDATORY READING: Review of ZERO WASTE HOME: THE ULTIMATE GUIDE TO SIMPLIFYING YOUR LIFE BY REDUCING YOUR WASTE by Bea Johnson

Zero Waste Home: The Ultimate Guide to Simplifying Your Life by Reducing Your Waste by Bea Johnson should be mandatory reading for every single person on Earth. This is a book about values that forces us to examine our own. The focus is on our consumption habits and the role they play in the destruction of this planet we all share. “Statistics and hard data are not my expertise,“ Johnson warns, “this is a practical guide based on my experience.”

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FIERCE COMPANY: Review of PAULINE KAEL: A LIFE IN THE DARK by Brian Kellow

FIERCE COMPANY: Review of PAULINE KAEL: A LIFE IN THE DARK by Brian Kellow

Pauline Kael: A Life in the Dark examines the personal life and career of Kael, who established herself, largely through her writing at The New Yorker, as the preeminent voice of 20th Century movie criticism. The book is well-written, well-researched, and Kellow does a good job of staying out of the way. What comes through is Kael’s voice.

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