SUPERFANS ONLY NEED APPLY: Review of THE AMAZING STORY OF THE FANTASTICKS by Donald C. Farber and Robert Viagas

SUPERFANS ONLY NEED APPLY: Review of THE AMAZING STORY OF THE FANTASTICKS by Donald C. Farber and Robert Viagas

When I was in high school on Long Island in the 1990s, my dream was to be on Broadway. The idea then was to be a “triple-threat”—the best at singing, dancing, and acting. I had no idea how to go about this at all. I thought I could accomplish much in my room, alone, in secret. I scoured the pages of Backstage for auditions, and sent headshot photos with my meager resume stapled to the back. One listing was for a part I’d actually played in a regional theater, the role of the young romantic lead in a small, eight-person musical called The Fantasticks.

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"WHAT A WASTE OF MUSIC:" Review of HIT SO HARD by Patty Schemel

"WHAT A WASTE OF MUSIC:" Review of HIT SO HARD by Patty Schemel

“What a waste of music not to take drugs!” opines drummer Patty Schemel in her 2017 memoir Hit So Hard (written with Erin Hosier). Sober since 2005, Schemel takes a look back at her life’s oppositional movements: her downward spiral into drugs and her rise to the rock ‘n roll top.

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LET FREEDOM RING: Review of NO TIME LIKE THE PRESENT: FINDING FREEDOM, LOVE, AND JOY RIGHT WHERE YOU ARE by Jack Kornfield

LET FREEDOM RING: Review of NO TIME LIKE THE PRESENT: FINDING FREEDOM, LOVE, AND JOY RIGHT WHERE YOU ARE by Jack Kornfield

No Time Like the Present values responding over reacting, creating space to understand and contextualize feelings. Its tone is wondering, compassionate, encouraging, and kind. It is also slyly political. Kornfield writes, “Politicians and media feed our fears…Yes, there are big problems…If you only worry, you’ll feel overwhelmed. What is indisputable is that you are here, now, and you can contribute…You are free to contribute to this world—every moment, every day.”  This call to action is the charge that all the drumbeats of the book seem to herald. Yet as Kornfield points out, “hatred never ceases by hatred, but by love alone is healed.”

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ASK, AND YE SHALL RECEIVE: Review of LOVING WHAT IS: FOUR QUESTIONS THAT CAN CHANGE YOUR LIFE by Byron Katie

ASK, AND YE SHALL RECEIVE: Review of LOVING WHAT IS: FOUR QUESTIONS THAT CAN CHANGE YOUR LIFE by Byron Katie

The real mystery of Loving What Is is not its methodology, but its author. Who is Byron Katie? She was (and sometimes still is) a heavy smoker, calls people she doesn’t know “sweetheart” and “honey,” and sometimes writes and talks in a tone marked by exasperation: “Peace is who you already are, without a story. Can you just live it?”

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HOT TOWN, SUMMER IN THE CITY: Review of DANCER FROM THE DANCE by Andrew Holleran

HOT TOWN, SUMMER IN THE CITY: Review of DANCER FROM THE DANCE by Andrew Holleran

Andrew Holleran’s 1978 novel, Dancer From the Dance, is about gay men in 1970s New York looking for love—and falling for the city itself. The romantic, elegiac tone has much in common with F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby and Truman Capote’s Breakfast at Tiffany’s. All three of these stories meditate on the power of beauty, mystery, doom, glamour, summer, and romance. All three are narrated by characters that stand outside the main action, and all three feature New York City as a central character. The city as it’s depicted here is more than a place: it’s an idea, often a romantic ideal, and sometimes a trap.

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TURN AND FACE THE STRANGE: Review of CHANGING by Liv Ullmann

TURN AND FACE THE STRANGE: Review of CHANGING by Liv Ullmann

Reading a celebrity memoir, one is naturally curious about how that person became famous. If the book isn’t well-written, everything comes across as cliché. If it lingers too long in the time before success, the reader gets impatient to get to “their big break.” (I would argue this is because their fame is “where we know them,” so to speak.) Reading about a celebrity who isn’t well known to you, you’re either bored, or looking for clues to solve a mystery: what makes this person special? Liv Ullman, the author of Changing, was one of director Ingmar Bergman’s leading ladies and the mother of one of his children. I’ve seen only a few of her films. Things about Changing perplexed me, but I was never bored.

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WAKE UP ALONE: Review of PICASSO AND DORA: A PERSONAL MEMOIR by James Lord

WAKE UP ALONE: Review of PICASSO AND DORA: A PERSONAL MEMOIR by James Lord

Picasso and Dora strikes me as a faithful account, but admirably it’s not to James’s own vanity. He comes across as the worst of the lot. Even his own mother remarks at one point, “‘I’m sure it’s very interesting for you to have met these famous people, but I can’t help wondering what it is they see in you.’”

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